{{featured_button_text}}

Editor:

After spending several weeks reading a number of books on our incredible universe, I was looking for something different to read. Walking by my library shelves I spotted a book I had purchased several years ago, “Grant and Twain: The Story of an American Friendship” by Mark Perry.

In 1884 when general and past president Ulysses S. Grant was penniless and dying from throat cancer, he was encouraged to write his memoirs by Mark Twain, author of many books and stories, the greatest of which was “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.”

You have free articles remaining.

Become a Member

Here we have two individuals whose life experiences, temperament and lifestyles were completely different. The only thing they both shared was a dislike of slavery, and yet they became close friends and in the late 1880s wrote two American masterpieces at the same time.

In our current climate of political division and unrest, maybe we could take a close look at what we have in common despite our differing backgrounds and views and try to bring out the best in each other as Grant and Twain did, almost 135 years ago. Now that would be something to write about.

George S. Armstrong, Whitehall

Be the first to know - Sign up for News Alerts

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0