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Second infestation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid also found in Dresden and Fort Ann

Second infestation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid also found in Dresden and Fort Ann

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Hemlock

A Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, or HWA infestation is seen. A second infestation has been located in the Adirondacks on the eastern shore of Lake George in the towns of Dresden and Fort Ann. Signs of infestation include white woolly masses about one-quarter the size of a cotton swab on the underside of branches at the base of needles, gray-tinted foliage, and needle loss.

The DEC confirmed the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid infestation around Lake George is worse than originally thought.

In August, the DEC confirmed an infestation was found in the Glen Island Campground. A second infestation has been confirmed in Dresden and Fort Ann after additional surveys, according to a DEC news release.

A previous infestation was found in 2017 on Prospect Mountain. The infestation was eradicated by insecticide, according to the DEC.

DEC, Cornell’s Hemlock Initiative, Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program and the Lake George Land Conservancy staff performed surveys at neighboring campsites near the first discovery and along 16.3 miles of shoreline.

The partners identified a Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, or HWA, infestation on nearly 250 acres along 1.5 miles of shoreline on the eastern shore of Lake George in Washington County.

Most of the infested trees have a low density of HWA, with the densest HWA infestations located along the shoreline. This initial data suggests the infestation started along the shoreline — perhaps by migrating birds — and expanded from there.

Surveyors have spent more than 500 hours surveying to date and will continue at priority locations to determine the extent of the infestation and find any additional infestations, according to a news release.

A treatment plan to control and prevent the spread of the invasive on Forest Preserve lands is underway among the DEC, Cornell University’s Hemlock Initiative, the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, Lake George Land Conservancy and The Fund for Lake George.

The most effective treatment is the use of insecticides. The treatment includes a basal bark application of the pesticides, involving spraying the pesticides at the base of the tree.

Consistent with best management practices, treatments will consist of applications of dinotefuran, a fast-acting insecticide that will quickly knock back HWA populations, and imidacloprid to provide long-lasting protection to hemlock trees in the area and prevent the spread of HWA to un-infested trees. DEC and partners are planning treatments to start this fall before HWA has the opportunity to spread next spring. In addition, DEC and Cornell are evaluating the use of biological controls to supplement these treatments.

Signs of HWA on hemlock trees includes white woolly masses about one-quarter the size of a cotton swab on the underside of branches at the base of needles, gray-tinted foliage, and needle loss.

DEC is asking the public to report signs of HWA by taking pictures with a coin for reference, noting the location and reporting to iMapInvasvies online at https://www.imapinvasives.org.

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