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Garlic mustard

The invasive garlic mustard plant is seen in this undated photo. 

An extensive report on terrestrial invasive species in Adirondack Park state campgrounds was recently released, detailing survey work over the 2018 summer season.

Since 2012, park stewards have surveyed about 4,000 acres of state land and documented over 1,000 infestations. Management of the invasive species has led stewards to find fewer populations each year, noting that in 2018, only 6,502 plants were removed, compared to 68,048 in 2012.

The surveys are split into six regions of the park.

Locally, the Warrensburg group includes Luzerne, Lake George Battleground, Hearthstone Point, Eagle Point, Scaroon Manor, Rogers Rock and the Lake George islands. The islands were not inventoried in 2018.

Six campgrounds were managed in 2018, according to the report, and invasive species were present at five.

Here are some highlights:

  • Eagle Point: No invasive plants present
  • Hearthstone Point: Garlic mustard, knotweed and bush honeysuckle were found at a high intensity; Japanese barberry and oriental bittersweet were found at a low intensity
  • Lake George Battleground: Garlic mustard found at an extreme intensity; knotweed, oriental bittersweet and bush honeysuckle were found at a high intensity; Japanese barberry was found at a moderate intensity
  • Luzerne: Bush honeysuckle was found at an extreme intensity
  • Rogers Rock: Garlic mustard, Japanese barberry and bush honeysuckle were found at high intensities
  • Scaroon Manor: Bush honeysuckle, oriental bittersweet and Japanese barberry were found at high intensities; winged burning bush found at a moderate intensity

The Lake George Battleground had the most plants removed of the bunch in 2018, with 4,341 garlic mustard plants.

The work is a collaborative effort between the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, the state Department of Environmental Conservation, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, with tools from the Nature Conservancy and others.

Skidmore to host climate conversation

The public is invited to a climate change talk from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7 at Skidmore College’s Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall, 815 North Broadway, Saratoga Springs.

Called, “Do we really have a climate crisis and can it be solved? A conversation on the future of the climate and humanity’s response,” the talk will feature Oren Cass and Andrew Revkin.

Cass is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and the former domestic policy director for Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, according to a news release. Revkin is an award-winning journalist and strategic adviser for environmental and science journalism for the National Geographic Society.

Visiting Skidmore professor Kristofer Covey and student Erin Mah will co-moderate the event.

Ice volcanoes seen on Lake Champlain



Ice volcanoes are lining parts of the Lake Champlain shoreline, according to the Lake Champlain Committee.

The phenomenon involves waves of water developing conical ice layers, while waves splash up through them. For the volcanoes to form, the temperatures must be below freezing and the wind must be blowing at 24 mph or faster.

Moreau Lake team-up

Hannaford Supermarkets and Friends of Moreau Lake State Park are teaming up for a fundraising program this February.

The Friends will be participating in the supermarket chain’s reusable bag program. During February, every community bag sold at the South Glens Falls store will lead to a $1 donation to the organization.

Bags can be purchased at Hannaford’s at 27-41 Gansevoort Road, South Glens Falls.

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Reporter Gwendolyn Craig can be reached at (518) 742-3238 or gcraig@poststar.com. Follow her on Twitter @gwendolynnn1.

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