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Hadlock Pond dam

A view of the north end of Hadlock Pond is seen in 2017. The Town Board is holding a special meeting at 1 p.m. Thursday to review the paid Lake Hadlock Park District manager position and what needs to be done to continue protecting the water body. 

FORT ANN — The Town Board is holding a special meeting at 1 p.m. Thursday to review the paid Lake Hadlock Park District manager position and what needs to be done to continue protecting the water body.

Town Supervisor Richard Moore said no action will be taken at the meeting, but board members will look at what has worked well and what might need to be changed, if anything.

The manager is part-time and currently makes $20,000 a year. That salary is paid by Fort Ann residents who are part of the Lake Hadlock Park District, which was created in 1977. Moore said residents know if they are part of the district through a line item on their tax bills.

Joe Loszynski currently holds the job, which the town made a paid position about two years ago.

Moore said the job was put on the payroll because of the increased amount of time it demanded as water quality duties grew. For example, Moore said, the position now includes greater interaction with the Adirondack Park Agency and other organizations and is more involved with the treatment of invasive species. Those found in the lake include Eurasian watermilfoil, curly-leaf pond weed, water chestnut and brittle naiad.

Loszynski has had a particularly trying time this year with aquatic invasive species, because the lake’s weed harvester broke earlier this summer. Moore said Loszynski was able to get it running on Wednesday, but it was still being tested to make sure it was working properly.

In a message to Lake Hadlock Association members, Loszynski said he hoped to brief the Town Board on Sept. 13 “as to the status of the lake project and recommendations moving forward concerning a more aggressive plan to manage aquatic invasive species. The session will be very informative on operational methodologies and the cost associated with implementing a new footprint to combat the expansion of invasive plants and better manage native vegetation life in Lake Hadlock.”

Lake Hadlock is called Hadlock Pond by the state Department of Environmental Conservation. It is 275 acres with an average depth of 16 feet, according to the state’s Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program for the lake in 2017. Its habitat is considered stressed because of invasive plants, and swimming and recreating is threatened because of algal blooms, according to the report. Its potable water, aquatic life and aesthetics are all considered to be in good condition.

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Reporter Gwendolyn Craig can be reached at (518) 742-3238 or gcraig@poststar.com. Follow her on Twitter

@gwendolynnn1.

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