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    The Federal Trade Commission and a handful of states announced settlements Monday with Google and iHeartMedia over misleading radio advertisements about a cellphone. It stems from complaints that Google paid to have radio personalities endorse and talk about their personal experience using the Pixel 4, even though many of them hadn't used the phone. California Attorney General Rob Bonta says the ads ran more than 23,000 times across 10 media markets. Google will pay $9 million. iHeartMedia, the largest owner of radio stations in the country, will pay $400,000. Arizona, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York and Texas are also involved in the case.

      Days after flocking to stores on Black Friday, consumers are turning online for Cyber Monday to score more discounts on gifts and other items that have ballooned in price because of high inflation. Adobe Analytics, which tracks transactions for top online retailers, forecasts Cyber Monday will remain the year’s biggest online shopping day and rake in up to $11.6 billion in sales. Some analysts expect the amount of items consumers purchase could remain unchanged - or even fall - compared to prior years. And profit margins are expected to be tight for retailers offering deeper discounts to attract budget-conscious consumers and clear out their bloated inventories.

        The Supreme Court is making a fuller reopening to the public following more than two and a half years of closures related to the coronavirus pandemic. Beginning Dec. 1, the high court will be open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., according to the Supreme Court’s website. The high court closed to the public in March 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. In October, the high court began allowing the public to attend arguments in the courtroom again on the approximately six days a month the court hears arguments, but the court building remained closed to visitors at other times.

          The Supreme Court says in a letter to Congress that there is “nothing to suggest” that Justice Samuel Alito violated ethics standards following a report that a 2014 decision he wrote was leaked in advance of its announcement. Monday's letter was in response to an inquiry from lawmakers following a New York Times report earlier this month. That report said that a former anti-abortion leader was told in advance the outcome of the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores case involving health care coverage of contraception. In a 5-4 decision, Alito wrote that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama’s health care legislation.

            The British government has abandoned a plan to force tech firms to remove internet content that is harmful but legal after the proposal drew strong criticism from lawmakers and civil liberties groups. The U.K. on Monday watered down its Online Safety Bill, an ambitious but controversial attempt to crack down on online racism, sexual abuse, bullying, fraud and other harmful material. In its original form, the bill gave regulators wide-ranging powers to sanction digital and social media companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter and TikTok. Critics expressed concern that a requirement for the biggest platforms to remove “legal but harmful” content could undermine free speech. The Conservative government of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has now dropped that part of the bill.

              China’s strategy of controlling the coronavirus with lockdowns, mass testing and quarantines has provoked the greatest show of public dissent against the ruling Communist Party in decades. Most protesters on the mainland and in Hong Kong have focused their anger on restrictions that confine families to their homes for months. Global health experts say the “zero-COVID” policies saved lives at first. But now China’s population has very little exposure to the virus. And China is using only domestically developed vaccines that are less effective than those widely used elsewhere. Experts agree that finding a path forward will be difficult without surges in cases and deaths.

              In honor of National Espresso Day, here's a look at the history of the espresso machine and how it came to be. The first steam-powered coffee machine was patented by Angelo Moriondo of Turin, Italy, in 1884.

              There’s nothing like the festive spread of beloved holiday meals to heighten the season’s celebratory gatherings. If you’re looking to enhance this year’s menu, try increasing the amount of plant-based foods. Adding plant foods, like vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils and whole grains, is a great way to make a meal healthier.

              A greater-than-expected demand for aid has forced the Connecticut General Assembly to considering how to cover the extra cost of promised bonuses for thousands of frontline workers who remained on the job the during the coronavirus pandemic. Connecticut lawmakers voted Monday in a special session to revamp the distribution formula for the $30 million Connecticut Premium Pay Program for private sector workers. A proposal also would earmark an additional $76.6 million. The move comes after officials predicted planned bonuses of up to $1,000 for eligible workers would end up being only $233, given the large number of claimants.

              New Jersey Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday his administration has launched a promised review of its handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. Murphy says his administration hired regional law firm Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads — which has offices in the state as well as Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — along with management consulting firm Boston Consulting Group to conduct the review. The review is expected to end with a report in late 2023, the governor said. New Jersey was among the first states hit by the virus, announcing its first positive case in early March 2020.

              Asian shares are trading mostly higher as market jitters decline over protests in China set off by growing public anger over COVID-19 restrictions. Benchmarks rose in early trading in Australia, South Korea and China, while shares fell in Japan. Oil prices fell. Japanese government data showed that the unemployment rate for October was unchanged from September at 2.6%, while the available jobs per job seeker increased. China's economy has been stifled by a “zero COVID” policy which includes lockdowns that continually threaten the global supply chain. Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street.

              The landmark trial over Arkansas' ban on gender-affirming care for children has resumed. A psychiatrist was called to the stand by the state on Monday as it defended its ban on doctors providing gender-affirming hormone treatment, puberty blockers or surgery to anyone under the age of 18. A federal judge last year temporarily blocked the law, which also would have banned doctors from referring patients elsewhere for such care. The psychiatrist who testified Monday criticized the use of such care for trans youth, but also said he was concerned about the impacts of the law cutting off treatments for some children.

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              Need gift ideas to help with the ladies in your life? This list will surely help you make the grade.

              It is common for families to include their pets in the holiday celebrations by giving them a taste of their favorite dishes. However, there are some traditional holiday foods that can be quite harmful to your pet.

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