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Reporter for The Post-Star, covering the city of Glens Falls, town and village of Lake George and northern Warren County communities.

On the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday announced that he has signed legislation to extend the deadline for people to claim workers’ compensation, disability and accidental death benefits as a result of helping with World Trade Center rescue, recovery and cleanup operations.

The deadline to file a Notice of Participation for lost wages and medical benefits as a result of involvement in recovery and cleanup from the attacks had been Sept. 11 of this year, but it has been extended until Sept. 11, 2022, according to a news release.

“It has been 17 years since the attacks of September 11 changed our world forever, and on that day and the weeks and months that followed, thousands of courageous workers and volunteers put their lives on the line to save others,” Cuomo said in a news release. "We will never forget the selfless heroes who did not make it home that day, and we owe first responders and those who aided in the recovery effort an eternal debt of gratitude. This bill rightly and fairly provides 9/11's brave recovery workers and volunteers the time they need to receive the health benefits and compensation they deserve."

To file a claim and for other resources, visit: www.wcb.ny.gov/WTC/wtc-assistance.jsp

Cuomo is also strongly encouraging all 9/11 responders to consider using the World Trade Center Health Program for both treatment and monitoring of their health. Responders are seen for free at the clinic.

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Michael Goot covers politics, business, the city of Glens Falls and the town and village of Lake George. Reach him at 518-742-3320 or mgoot@poststar.com and follow his blog at http://poststar.com/blogs/michael_goot/.

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