Details for MARKETING/HOUSE FREE - Ad from 2019-09-08

STORIES

HONOR

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★OF
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
Janice Monroe is among several veterans honored at
The Granville Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing

★★ ★★★★★★★

a story of

resolve
& assistance

Janice Monroe followed in her father
father’ss footsteps into the mili
military

Inspired by her father’s service, Janice Monroe served in the Marine Corps from
1970-1973. She worked in data processing in Barstow, California.
She is currently residing in Granville, New York.

Story By | MeliSSA GuAy

S

ome little girls
dream
of
being
princesses
when
they grow up. Janice
Monroe dreamed of
being a soldier.
“I knew I wanted
to go into the service
ever since I was a little
girl. My dad was in the
Army, and I was in love
with my dad so I loved
the service. It was that
simple,” said the Hyde
Park native.
Monroe said her
father served stateside
during World War II
before she was old
enough to experience
it firsthand, “but the
pictures of him in his
uniform still had a big
impact.”
“I would touch his
old uniform, and I used
to love to play with the
insignia of his uniform.
It was shiny and I just
was enthralled. That’s

all it took,” she said.
Monroe enlisted in
the Marine Corps in
1970, at the age of 21.
“I liked the reputation
the Marines had for
being tough, so that’s
where I decided to
enlist,” she said.
Monroe went off
to boot camp from
around Thanksgiving to
Christmas of 1970.
“There was a lot or
marching and drilling.
Some women cried.
One girl held onto the
leg of her bunk and
wouldn’t let go even
when they pulled on
her. I didn’t think it was
that tough, though,”
she said laughing.
“IthinkIwasprobably
just a tough little thing.
I use to run on my dad’s
40-acre property and
helped load and unload
groceries and stock for
his store. Also, I was

PRESENTED BY

living my dream in a
way. I always wanted
to go to the service so
I took advantage of the
opportunity,” she said.
After boot camp,
Monroe
went
to
military
school
in San Diego for
communications. Upon
completion, Monroe
was stationed at the
Barstow Marine Corps
Supply Center in
Barstow, California.
“At first they put me
in data card punching,
but I wasn’t supposed
to be there. Finally,
they moved me to data
processing, where we’d
program the computers
with the data cards to
run certain programs,”
she said.
Monroe said she
worked in a large
room with about four
other women. The key
cards and computer

programs helped the
Marine Corps keep
track of things like
inventory, orders and
personnel.
While serving in
Barstow, Monroe was
also trained at the
Marine Corps Physical
Fitness Institute as
a
physical
fitness
instructor for the
fitness center there.
“I worked with the
wives of the soldiers,
helping with their clubs
and physical fitness
goals,” she said.
Monroe
was
discharged in 1973,
with the rank of
sergeant. Still desiring
a military connection,
Monroe enlisted in
the National Guard
Reserves, then the U.S.
Army Reserves. She
began taking college
courses, finishing with
a degree in behavioral

★ THaNk YOu ★

for helping support our military heros.

science from SUNY
New Paltz.
“I eventually settled
in
Poughkeepsie
working at the Office
for the Aging. I was
there for about four
years until I went home
to Newcomb to care
for my father in 1996,”
Monroe said.
Monroe
started
her career there as
a resident counselor
in group homes for
the developmentally
disabled.
“I’ve always liked
helping people. I think
it’s just my natural way.
It was how I was raised.
I think that’s why the
military appealed to me
so much,” she said.
Still, her favorite
career was that of her
military service.
“It was my dream
coming true. If I had it
to do over I’d have gone

PARTICIPATING SPONSOR:

to college first then
into the Army to be a
commissioned officer,”
she said.
In 2018, Monroe
relocated
to
the
Granville Center for
Rehabilitation
and
Nursing for help with
sciatica and knee
pain. She said she is
undecided if she will
remain a permanent
resident.
“It’s really nice here,
and they do a lot to
honor those who have
served in the military,
which means a lot,”she
said.★

About This Series

Stories of Honor is an
exclusive series spotlighting 10
military heroes from our region
who were nominated by our
readers to honor their bravery,
service and dedication. These
profiles will be featured on
Sundays through
September.

SuPPORTING ADvERTISER:

PARTICIPATING SPONSOR:

Categories

You may be interested in

Welcome to the discussion.

Comments will not be posted if any of the following rules are violated:
- Comments must be contained to the topic of the articles only.
- Comments must be civil in tone and cannot contain personal insults directed toward another reader.
- Profanities cannot be used, including abbreviations or acronyms.
- Comments critical of crime or accident victims, or imply guilt are not allowed.
- Comments that are potentially libelous, including those that contain accusations not supported by facts are not allowed.
- Comments that appear to be taunting others who comment are not allowed.
- Comments should be brief and never more than 1,000 characters.