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DEAR ABBY: I have been married to my husband for 22 years. We’ve been together for 26. We’ve had our ups and downs and separated for three months back in 2008, but we went to marriage counseling and got back together.I have recently realized that my husband is an accomplished liar and has been from day one. To top it off, he lies about stupid things, which makes me wonder what important things he’s lying about. When I express my feelings about this, he swears he will never lie again, blah blah blah — and damn if I don’t catch him again! Is this marriage doomed because he can’t stop lying? And how do I trust anything he ever says to me?

UNTRUSTING IN MARYLAND DEAR UNTRUSTING: Successful marriages are based on trust and communication. Yours is in serious trouble.

Most people who lie do so because they are trying to make themselves look better or are not proud of whatever it is they are attempting to cover up. However, those who lie about “stupid” things may be compulsive liars who can’t control the impulse. If your spouse falls into this category, a licensed mental health professional may be able to help him overcome his problem, but there are no guarantees.

DEAR ABBY: My elderly mother, my daughter, her boyfriend and I are planning a trip to Las Vegas. Because of the costs involved, we are considering sharing a room with two queen beds. The plan would be for me and my mother to share one bed, and my daughter and her boyfriend to share the other.

My wife thinks this is weird — that my mother and I should share a bed. I explained that it will be a queen bed, and I don’t understand why she thinks it is strange. This will save us around $1,000 that a second room would cost. What do you think?RALPH IN OHIO

DEAR RALPH: Is saving the money more important to you than privacy, comfort and propriety? Your wife may have been thinking along those lines when she suggested the “boys” sleep with the boys and the “girls” sleep together. Before rendering an opinion, I’d have to know what your daughter, her boyfriend and your mother think about this arrangement, because unless you all agree, it might make more sense to request a cot or bring an air mattress with you.P.S. If one of you gets lucky in Vegas, maybe you can afford a second room.

DEAR ABBY: After years of nagging about thank-you notes, this is how I’m encouraging my younger family members to acknowledge gifts: We have the child create a big thank-you note or draw a picture, hold it with a big smile along with the gift and take a photo, which we send electronically.

We made a rule that they can’t play with the gift until the thank-you is done, and even little folks understand it. It’s fun and immediate. They usually get a quick note of appreciation back, and the giver gets a keepsake of the occasion.NEW AGE GRANDMA

DEAR GRANDMA: That’s a wonderful idea, not only because it utilizes technology, but also because it requires SOME effort on the part of the little ones. Good for you.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


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