Feature writer, photographer

The Crandall Library, in conjunction with the Glens Falls Branch of the NAACP, announced this week the schedule for the 19th Annual African American Film Forum which starts on Tuesday, Feb. 6.

Films are screened at 6:30 p.m. in the Christine L. McDonald Community Room. 

Feb. 6:  "Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities"

A haven for Black intellectuals, artists and revolutionaries - and path of promise toward the American dream - Black colleges and universities have educated the architects of freedom movements and cultivated leaders in every field. They have been unapologetically Black for more than 150 years. For the first time ever, their story is told. Directed by award-winning documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson.

Feb. 13: "Whose Streets?"

Told by the activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice, "Whose Streets?" is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising. When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis, Missouri. Grief, long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil and protest this latest tragedy. Empowered parents, artists, and teachers from around the country come together as freedom fighters. As the National Guard descends on Ferguson with military grade weaponry, these young community members become the torchbearers of a new resistance. Filmmakers Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis know this story because they are the story. Whose Streets? is a powerful battle cry from a generation fighting, not for their civil rights, but for the right to live. — Rottentomatoes.com

Feb. 20: "Henry Johnson: a Tale of Courage"

Henry Johnson was an African American U.S. Army soldier who fought heroically in the 369th Infantry Regiment of the U.S. Army in World War I. In May 1918 in the Argonne Forest of Northeast France, Johnson fought off a German raid in hand-to-hand combat, killing multiple German soldiers and rescuing a fellow soldier before fainting from the 21 wounds with which he was afflicted. "Henry Johnson: A Tale of Courage" tells the story of his life, his family, and the extensive efforts to honor his bravery and courage after his death. Johnson was finally honored with the Purple Heart in 1996, the Distinguished Service Cross in 2002, and the Medal of Honor in 2015. —PBS.org

Feb. 27: "I Am Not Your Negro"

"I Am Not Your Negro" is an examination of racism in America through the lens of James Baldwin’s unfinished book, "Remember This House." Intended as an account of the lives of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr., each of whom James Baldwin personally knew, only a 30-page manuscript of the book was ever completed. Combining Baldwin’s manuscript with footage of depictions of African-Americans throughout American history, "I Am Not Your Negro" uses Baldwin’s words to illuminate the pervasiveness of American racism and the efforts to curtail it, from the civil rights movement to #BlackLivesMatter. Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, I Am Not Your Negro explores the continued peril America faces from institutionalized racism. - Kinolorberedu.com

Kathleen Phalen-Tomaselli is a features writer at The Post-Star. She can be reached at kphalen-tomaselli@poststar.com for comments or story ideas. 

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