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I wrote last week about the problems my neighborhood has had with a foreclosed home that is fallen into a bad state of disrepair. Obviously it's not a new problem around the state and country thanks to the housing bubble's burst in the late 2000s, but it has been an increasing source of angst for those of us who live near an abandoned home.

I got a few tips from readers who had taken action in similar situations, with some success. Kingsbury Supervisor Dana Hogan suggested the state Department of Financial Services' mortgage complaint program, which has a website to easily make complaints about mortgagor issues. He said he has seen them state take action based on those complaints in less than a week. Here is a link to the site, if you have a similar issue in your neighborhood.

Another reader who works in a local municipal program to hold banks accountable in these situations said there are options that towns, villages and cities have to force the banks to maintain properties, but that some municipalities are more aggressive than others. He offered to reach out to the town of Queensbury to offer some help.

Another reader told me that banks drag their feet in foreclosure processes because they claim going through a foreclosure costs them up to $70,000 apiece. I don't know how that could be true, but seeing the fees that banks charge at every turn, I would imagine everyone involved is imposing every fee they can.

-- Don Lehman

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reporter

Don Lehman covers crime and Warren County government for The Post-Star. His work can be found on Twitter @PS_CrimeCourts and on poststar.com/app/blogs.

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